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SWD Commanders

 Col. Eugene Reybold 

 1937-1940   

 Col. Stanley L. Scott 

1940-1942 

 Col. Robert R. Neyland, Jr.    

1942-1944

 Brig. Gen. Edwin H. Marks

1944-1946

 Col. Henry Hutchings, Jr.

1946-1949

 Col. Louis W. Prentiss

1949-1952

 Brig. Gen. Herbert D. Vogel

1952-1954

 Brig. Gen. Lyle E. Seeman

1954-1958

 Brig. Gen. William Whipple

1958-1960

 Col. Stanlely G. Reiff

1960-1960

 Maj. Gen. Robert J. Fleming, Jr

1960-1962

 Brig. Gen. Carroll H. Dunn

1962-1964

 Brig. Gen. Richard H. Free

1964-1966

 Brig. Gen. William T. Bradley

1966-1968

 Maj. Gen. Clarence  C. Haug

1968-1969

 Maj. Gen. Harold R. Parfitt

1969-1973

 Brig. Gen. Harry A. Griffith

1973-1974

 Maj. Gen. Charles I. McGinnis

1974-1977

 Brig. Gen. James C. Donovan

1977-1980

 Maj. Gen. Hugh G. Robinson

1980-1983

 Maj. Gen. Robert J. Dacey

1983-1985

 Maj. Gen. J.B. Hilmes

1985-1988

 Brig. Gen. Robert C. Lee

1988-1990

 Brig.  Gen. Stanley G. Genega

1990-1992

 Brig. Gen. Robert L. Herndon

1992-1993

 Col. James Paul King

1993-1995

 Brig. Gen. Henry S. Miller, Jr.

1995-1997

 Col. Donald R. Holzwarth

1997-1998

 Brig. Gen. Edwin J. Arnold, Jr.

1998-2000

 Brig. Gen. David F. Melcher

2000-2002

 Brig. Gen. Robert Crear

2002-2004

 Brig. Gen. Jeffrey J. Dorko

2004-2007

 Brig. Gen. Kendall P. Cox

2007-2009

 Col. Anthony C. Funkhouser

2009-2010

 Brig. Gen. Thomas W. Kula

2010-2014

 Brig. Gen. David C. Hill

2014-2017

 Brig. Gen. Paul E. Owen

2017-

The Origins of SWD

The Southwestern Division, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, was created in 1937, as a result of large and catastrophic flood events that led up to Congress passing the Flood Control Act of 1936.  That Act recognized that flood control was a federal responsibility and authorized 211 flood control projects in 31 states.  It authorized five reservoirs and a variety of levee construction and improvement projects on the Arkansas River Drainage Basin.  To oversee these projects, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers established two offices on July 1, 1937:  the Little Rock District and the Southwestern Division.  SWD also took over areas in the watershed of the Canadian River and its tributaries west of the Texas-New Mexico border.

In 1939, SWD’s workload increased with the addition of two new Districts:  the Denison District (sponsored by House Majority Leader Sam Rayburn to build Texoma Reservoir on the Red River in Texas for both flood control and hydropower) and the Tulsa District (for flood control, hydropower, and navigation).

Nearly doubling SWD’s territorial area was the addition of the Galveston District on Jan. 15, 1941. With the addition of the Galveston District, the geography and the topography of SWD ranged from wetlands on the eastern portion to desert on the west.   Galveston District was transferred to SWD due organizational changes in the Corps brought on by new military requirements for World War II.  For that same reason, SWD moved from Little Rock to Dallas on Feb 1, 1941, ensuring a more centralized and accessible location from which to oversee the Districts. 

Post World War II, renewed economic growth in America led to the creation of SWD’s Fort Worth District in March 1950. This development was a result of the increased construction of reservoirs in north Texas on the Brazos and Trinity Rivers.  A sub-office in Fort Worth faced closure because of budgetary constraints, but local officials, including the Trinity Improvement Association, fought for a District Office in Fort Worth.  A major flood event on the Clear Fork of the Trinity River added urgency to the cause, and the Fort Worth District was created.

(Source:  The Southwestern Division, 50 Years of Service, by D.  Clayton Brown, PhD)

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SWD Over the Years

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